Peace Agreement between the Government of Sierra Leone and the Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone (RUF/SL) (Lome Agreement)

Country/entity
Sierra Leone
Region
Africa (excl MENA)
Agreement name
Peace Agreement between the Government of Sierra Leone and the Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone (RUF/SL) (Lome Agreement)
Date
07/07/1999
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Sierra Leone Civil War (1991 – 2002)
In March 1991, the Revolutionary United Front (RUF) launched an armed assault in an attempt to oust the corrupt regime of Joseph Momoh. Grievances were primarily focused on unequal distribution of economic goods. RUF took over large areas by 1992, the poor government response instigating a coup d’état in 1992. After 1993 the RUF gained and lost territory in waves. In 1996, following an intervention on behalf of the government by the private military company, Executive Outcomes, the Abidjan Agreement was signed. Another coup in 1997, however, sparked new fighting and the RUF alongside the new government captured Freetown. Despite declarations that the war had ended, the international community intervened. The Economic Community of West African States Monitoring Group (ECOMOG) recaptured Freetown on behalf of the government. The Lome Peace Accord was signed in 1999, issuing a power-sharing deal, but by 2000 RUF was once again advancing towards Freetown. As the UN mission floundered, the UK government stepped in and by January 2002, the civil war was declared to be over.

Sierra Leone Civil War (1991 – 2002) )
Stage
Framework/substantive - comprehensive (Agreement)
Conflict nature
Government
Peace process
77: Sierra Leone peace process
Parties
Alhaji Ahmad Tejan Kabbah, President of the Republic of Sierra Leone;
Corporal Foday Saybana Sankoh, Leader of the Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone
Third parties
His Excellency Gnassingbe Eyadema, President of the Togolese Republic Chairman of ECOWAS;
His Excellency Blaise Compaore, President of Burkina Faso;
His Excellency Dahkpanah Dr. Charles Ghankey Taylor, President of the Republic of Liberia;
His Excellency Olusegun Obasanjo, President and Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria;
His Excellency Youssoufou Bamba, Secretary of State at the Foreign Mission in charge of International Cooperation of Cote d'Ivoire;
His Excellency Victor Gbeho, Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Ghana;
Mr. Roger Laloupo, Representative of the ECOWAS Special Representative;
Ms. Adwoa Coleman, Representative Organization of African Unity.
Ambassador Francis G. Okelo, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Secretary General
Dr. Moses K.Z. Anafu, Representative of the Commonwealth of Nations

Page 20, PART SEVEN, MORAL GUARANTORS AND INTERNATIONAL SUPPORT, ARTICLE XXXIV, MORAL GUARANTORS:
The Government of the Togolese Republic, the United Nations, the OAU, ECOWAS and the Commonwealth of Nations shall stand as Moral Guarantors that this Peace Agreement is implemented with integrity and in good faith by both parties.

Description
A comprehensive peace agreement consisting of 8 parts and 5 Annexes. The agreement covers a wide range of issues including the cessation of Hostilities, governance, amnesty, elections, constitutional reform, post-conflict military and security issues, humanitarian, human rights and socio-economic issues, the implementation of the agreement, and international support for the agreemeent.

Agreement document
SL_990707_Lome Peace Agreement.pdf

Main category
Page 18, Part 5, Humanitarian, Human Rights, and Socio-Economic Issues, ARTICLE XXVIII, POST-WAR REHABILITATION AND RECONSTRUCTION, 2:
Given that women have been particularly victimized during the war, special attention shall be accorded to their needs and potentials in formulating and implementing national rehabilitation, reconstruction and development programmes, to enable them to play a central role in the moral, social and physical reconstruction of Sierra Leone.

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
No specific mention.
International law
No specific mention.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
No specific mention.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
No specific mention.
Development
Rehabilitation and reconstruction
Page 18, Part 5, Humanitarian, Human Rights, and Socio-Economic Issues, Article XXVIII, Post-War Rehabilitation and Reconstruction, para 2
Given that women have been particularly victimized during the war, special attention shall be accorded to their needs and potentials in formulating and implementing national rehabilitation, reconstruction and development programmes, to enable them to play a central role in the moral, social and physical reconstruction of Sierra Leone.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh