Déclaration de principe des parties aux négociations de Libreville sur la crise Centrafricaine

Country/entity
Central African Republic
Region
Africa (excl MENA)
Agreement name
Déclaration de principe des parties aux négociations de Libreville sur la crise Centrafricaine
Date
11/01/2013
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Central African Republic Conflicts (1996 - )
The Central African Republic conflict is one of a set of regionally connected conflicts addressed by the Great Lakes process. Since the mid-1990s several waves of internal conflict took place in the Central African Republic, primarily along tribal, and later-on increasingly sectarian, lines. In 1996 and 1997, French troops and soldiers from neighbouring countries intervened to end a mutiny in the capital, Bangui, by factions of the army. The fighting was predominantly along tribal lines, with southern tribes in revolt against the ‘northern’ government. A UN mission was installed in 1998 to secure the truce.

After General Bozizé took control of the country after several coup attempts in 2003, a ‘bush war’ began led by armed opposition forces. From late 2006 onward, government troops with French military support severely weakened the rebels. Following this, a number of agreements were signed during 2007-2008, but not all factions have accepted them. In 2011, Bozizé was re-elected in supposedly fraudulent elections, which resulted in a new wave of uprisings. Séléka, an alliance of northern rebel groups, took over parts of the country and forced Bozizé to agree to a power-sharing deal. However, after this agreement broke down, Séléka took control of Bangui and Bozizé had to flee the country.

Central African Republic Conflicts (1996 - ) )
Stage
Pre-negotiation/process (Principles)
Conflict nature
Government
Peace process
17: CAR: coups and rebellions process
Does this need new name?
Parties
For the CAR Government
- Jean WILLYBIRO SAKO

For the SELEKA Coalition (UFDR, CPJP, CPSK, UFR)
- Michel DJOTODJIA

For the Politico-Military Movements
- Abdoulaye HISSEIN

For the Democratic Opposition
- Master Nicolas TIANGAYE

For CEEAC
- Nassour GUELENGDOUKSIA OUAIDOU, Secretary General of CEEAC

For the Republic of Chad
- Moussa Faki MAHAMAT, Minister of Foreign Affairs

For the President of the Monitoring Committee (Comite de Suivi)
- Basile IKOUEBE, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of the Republic of Congo
Third parties
Description
This agreement provides for the cessation of hostilities without delay or conditions.Other issues covered include humanitarian assistance, human rights and sexual violence in conflict.

Agreement document
CF_130111_DeclarationDePrincipeSurLaCriseCentrafricaine_tr.pdf

Agreement document (original language)
CF_130111_DeclarationDePrincipeSurLaCriseCentrafricaine.pdf

Main category
Page 1, We, the belligerent parties concerned, undertake in the present Declaration to:
...
• Respect humans rights, particularly those of women and children, and to abstain from acts of sexual violence towards women, and from recruiting children as soldiers;

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
No specific mention.
International law
General IHRL, IHL and IL
Page 2, Para 7
Through this declaration concerning the warring parties, we commit to:
...
respect human rights, particularly children's and women's rights, and to refrain from all acts of sexual violence against women on the one hand, and the recruitment of child soldiers on the other hand.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
Sexual violence
Page 2, Para 7
Through this declaration concerning the warring parties, we commit to:
...
respect human rights, particularly children's and women's rights, and to refrain from all acts of sexual violence against women on the one hand, and the recruitment of child soldiers on the other hand.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
No specific mention.
Development
No specific mention.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh