Comunicado FARC-Gobierno del viaje a Europa, 2 de marzo de 2000

Country/entity
Colombia
Region
Americas
Agreement name
Comunicado FARC-Gobierno del viaje a Europa, 2 de marzo de 2000
Date
02/03/2000
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Interim arrangement
No
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Colombian Conflict (1964 - )
The Colombian conflict is really a set of conflicts and the peace agreements reflect both different processes relating to different conflict groups and dyads, and processes taking place at different times in a complex peace process history. The Colombian civil war has its roots in the late 1940s and the violent infighting between liberal and the conservative factions. Emerging from the liberal tradition with a thorough grounding in nationalist communist ideology, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army (FARC) began its armed insurrection against the Colombian government in 1964. Other left-wing guerrillas emerged as well, most notably the socialist/populist M-19, which would later be integrated into the formal political system in the peace process of 1990s; the National Liberation Army (ELN), which has strong roots in liberation theology, and the Maoist Ejército Popular de Liberación (EPL) (also part of the 1990 process, less successfully). Several stages of peace processes were undertaken by the various sides, which were further complicated by the emergence of right-wing paramilitary ‘self-defence’ forces. The peace agreement between the Colombian government under President Uribe and the main alliance of the paramilitary groups, the United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia (AUC), concluded in 2005 and is still heavily disputed as several remnants are still active, but now subsumed under the heading ‘Bacrim’ (Bandas criminales). In addition, FARC and ELN maintain a military presence, but both demonstrate a strong interest in completing successful peace negotiations with the government, with the most recent agreements being between FARC and the Government.

Colombian Conflict (1964 - ) )
Stage
Pre-negotiation/process (Mixed)
Conflict nature
Government
Peace process
99: Colombia III - Arango
Parties
For the National Government:
Victor G. Ricardo, High Commission for Peace
Luis Norberto Guerra, Vice-President, House of Representatives
Fabio Valencia Cossio, Negotiator
Camilo Gomez Alzate, Negotiator
Juan Gabriel Uribe, Negotiator
Miguel Pinedo Vidal, Thematic Committee
Ciro Ramirez, Vice-Precident, House of Senate
Luis Carlos Villegas, President of the National Business Association (Andi).

For the FARC-EP:
Raul Reyes, FARC-EP Spokesperson
Joaquin Gomez, Negotiator
Fabian Ramirez, Negotiator
Ivan Rios, Technical Committee Coordinator
Simon Trinidad, Technical Committee.
Felipe Rincon, Technical Committee.
Olga Lucia Marin, Technical Committee.
Third parties
Description
Agreed account of journeys to Sweden, Norway, Italy, the Vatican, Switzerland, Spain and France, noting that delegations learned about the different economic models operating in those countries, and noting frank and open discussions between the parties on all issues of the peace process, the discussion on human rights and IHL was advanced by the parties, with the faciliation of the ICRC,

Agreement document
CO_000302_Comunicado FARC-Gobierno del viaje a Europa, 2 de marzo de 2000 - tr.pdf []

Agreement document (original language)
CO_000223_Comunicado FARC-Gobierno del viaje a Europa, 23 de febrero de 2000_ES.pdf []

Groups

Children/youth
No specific mention.
Disabled persons
No specific mention.
Elderly/age
No specific mention.
Migrant workers
No specific mention.
Racial/ethnic/national group
No specific mention.
Religious groups
No specific mention.
Indigenous people
No specific mention.
Other groups
No specific mention.
Refugees/displaced persons
No specific mention.
Social class
No specific mention.

Gender

Women, girls and gender
No specific mention.
Men and boys
No specific mention.
LGBTI
No specific mention.
Family
No specific mention.

State definition

State definition
No specific mention.

Governance

Political institutions (new or reformed)
No specific mention.
Constitution's affirmation/renewal
No specific mention.
Constitutional reform/making
No specific mention.
Elections
No specific mention.
Electoral commission
No specific mention.
Political parties reform
No specific mention.
Civil society
Page 1,
... There are various lessons and we have no doubt they will make a significant contribution to the talks of the National Roundtable for Dialogue and Negotiation and the task of the National Thematic Committee in organising public audiences that will guarantee public participation in the peace process. ...

Page 3, The importance of human rights and international humanitarian law
In Europe we made significant progress in discussing an issue that concerns Colombians and the international community, namely respect for human rights and international humanitarian law. From the talks with the president of the International Red Cross Committee (Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja, CICR), we agreed that it is necessary to differentiate between them. We also reached a consensus in another aspect noted in the communication from the mountains of Norway on 11 February: the defence of human rights ultimately corresponds to states, while international humanitarian law is universal. Regarding this aspect, we also agree on the need for the roundtable to receive advice from CICR on human rights and international humanitarian law, as required.
Traditional/religious leaders
No specific mention.
Public administration
No specific mention.

Power sharing

Political power sharing
No specific mention.
Territorial power sharing
No specific mention.
Economic power sharing
No specific mention.
Military power sharing
No specific mention.

Human rights and equality

Human rights/RoL
No specific mention.
Equality
Page 4, Social reforms,
The international visit increased our awareness of the need for reforms to deliver peace
founded on social justice and the great responsibility of building the new Colombia where
everyone has a place.
From the various lessons, we reached the clear conclusion that where reconciliation has
failed, it has been because of the lack of a solution to social issues or the lack of the political
willpower of the parties.

Page 5,
... Now is the time for all Colombians to join us in the historic task of building peace. No one can
be left behind in this great task, since this would mean their absence from the new peaceful
Colombia with democracy, freedom and social justice, to which we are all committed. ...
Democracy
Page 5,
... Now is the time for all Colombians to join us in the historic task of building peace. No one can
be left behind in this great task, since this would mean their absence from the new peaceful
Colombia with democracy, freedom and social justice, to which we are all committed. ...
Protection measures
No specific mention.
Human rights framework
Treaty incorporation
Page 3, The importance of human rights and international humanitarian law
In Europe we made significant progress in discussing an issue that concerns Colombians and
the international community, namely respect for human rights and international
humanitarian law. From the talks with the president of the International Red Cross Committee
(Comité Internacional de la Cruz Roja, CICR), we agreed that it is necessary to differentiate
between them. We also reached a consensus in another aspect noted in the communication
from the mountains of Norway on 11 February: the defence of human rights ultimately
corresponds to states, while international humanitarian law is universal.
Regarding this aspect, we also agree on the need for the roundtable to receive advice from
CICR on human rights and international humanitarian law, as required.
Civil and political rights
No specific mention.
Socio-economic rights
No specific mention.
NHRI
No specific mention.
Regional or international human rights institutions
No specific mention.
Mobility/access
No specific mention.
Detention procedures
No specific mention.
Media and communication
No specific mention.
Citizenship
No specific mention.

Justice sector reform

Criminal justice and emergency law
No specific mention.
State of emergency provisions
No specific mention.
Judiciary and courts
No specific mention.
Prisons and detention
No specific mention.
Traditional Laws
No specific mention.

Socio-economic reconstruction

Development or socio-economic reconstruction
Socio-economic development
Page 1,
... The country must come up with an economic, political and social model that rejects
corruption, drug trafficking and violence to be presented to the Colombian people for their
consideration. ...

Page 4, Social reforms,
The international visit increased our awareness of the need for reforms to deliver peace
founded on social justice and the great responsibility of building the new Colombia where
everyone has a place.
From the various lessons, we reached the clear conclusion that where reconciliation has
failed, it has been because of the lack of a solution to social issues or the lack of the political
willpower of the parties.
National economic plan
No specific mention.
Natural resources
No specific mention.
International funds
No specific mention.
Business
No specific mention.
Taxation
No specific mention.
Banks
No specific mention.

Land, property and environment

Land reform/rights
No specific mention.
Pastoralist/nomadism rights
No specific mention.
Cultural heritage
No specific mention.
Environment
No specific mention.
Water or riparian rights or access
No specific mention.

Security sector

Security Guarantees
No specific mention.
Ceasefire
No specific mention.
Police
No specific mention.
Armed forces
No specific mention.
DDR
No specific mention.
Intelligence services
No specific mention.
Parastatal/rebel and opposition group forces
No specific mention.
Withdrawal of foreign forces
No specific mention.
Corruption
Page 1,
... The country must come up with an economic, political and social model that rejects
corruption, drug trafficking and violence to be presented to the Colombian people for their
consideration. ...
Crime/organised crime
No specific mention.
Drugs
Page 1,
... The country must come up with an economic, political and social model that rejects
corruption, drug trafficking and violence to be presented to the Colombian people for their
consideration. ...
Terrorism
No specific mention.

Transitional justice

Transitional justice general
No specific mention.
Amnesty/pardon
No specific mention.
Courts
No specific mention.
Mechanism
No specific mention.
Prisoner release
No specific mention.
Vetting
No specific mention.
Victims
No specific mention.
Missing persons
No specific mention.
Reparations
No specific mention.
Reconciliation
Page 4, Social reforms,
From the various lessons, we reached the clear conclusion that where reconciliation has failed, it has been because of the lack of a solution to social issues or the lack of the political will power of the parties.

Implementation

UN signatory
No specific mention.
Other international signatory
No specific mention.
Referendum for agreement
No specific mention.
International mission/force/similar
No specific mention.
Enforcement mechanism
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh