Fezzan Humanitarian Agreement

Country/entity
Libya
Region
Middle East and North Africa
Agreement name
Fezzan Humanitarian Agreement
Date
16/06/2016
Agreement status
Status unclear
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/local conflict (Libyan Conflicts (1969 - 1994) (2011 - )
Agreements relate to two distinct conflict dyads.
Libya-Chad. Since the 1970s, Libya under Colonel Muammar Gaddafi had a tense relationship with its neighbour Chad, predominantly focused on the resource-rich Aouzou Strip in northern Chad. Libyan claims of the Aouzou Strip were held in an un-ratified treaty between France and Italy in 1935, similarly Chadian claims of the Strip were argued with support of a 1955 treaty between Libya and France. In 1973, Libya effectively annexed the Strip to gain access to natural resources. This spurred cross-border clashes between 1979 until 1987 until escalated to a brief war known as the Toyota War, wherein Chadian government troops succeeded in repelling Libyan forces. A brief and repeatedly violated ceasefire was held from 1987-88, followed by a series of unsuccessful negotiations, until an International Court of Justice ruling in 1994, which granted sovereignty of the Strip to Chad.

Libya post-Gaddafi. Gaddafi’s downfall following the Libyan Civil War in 2011-2012, led to several factions fighting for the country’s leadership. Since 2013, the country effectively split into three entities, with the National Army controlling the east including the city of Benghazi, and the New General National Congress and their militias such as the Golden Dawn controlling the northwest including the capital of Tripoli. Significant portions of the country in the south-west are currently held by Tuareg forces.

Libyan Conflicts (1969 - 1994) (2011 - ) )
Stage
Pre-negotiation/process (Confidence building measure)
Conflict nature
Inter-group
Peace process
78: Libyan local processes
Parties
Third parties
The Community of Sant'Egidio [signed];
[11 additional signatories]
Description
Agreement underscores the need to secure access for humanitarian aid, particularly to health centers in eight cities, and leverages this need as a confidence building measure between signatories. Mediated by the Community of Sant’Egidio.

Agreement document
LY_160616_Fezzan Humanitarian Agreement mediated by Sant'Egidio_tr.pdf

Agreement document (original language)
LY_160616_Fezzan Humanitarian Agreement mediated by Sant'Egidio.pdf

Main category
Page 1, So, we will do everything we can, and we will work together as one, to facilitate the access of aid, in full, to the whole population, without any discrimination and with justice in distribution, giving priority to the most vulnerable groups, like children, women, and the elderly.

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
No specific mention.
International law
No specific mention.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
No specific mention.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
No specific mention.
Development
No specific mention.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
Page 1, So, we will do everything we can, and we will work together as one, to facilitate the access of aid, in full, to the whole population, without any discrimination and with justice in distribution, giving priority to the most vulnerable groups, like children, women, and the elderly.

The University of Edinburgh