Synthesis of the Harmonised Claims of the Armed Groups of the RCO Bouar, of 30 August 2018

Country/entity
Central African Republic
Region
Africa (excl MENA)
Agreement name
Synthesis of the Harmonised Claims of the Armed Groups of the RCO Bouar, of 30 August 2018
Date
30/08/2018
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Interim arrangement
No
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Central African Republic Conflicts (1996 - )
The Central African Republic conflict is one of a set of regionally connected conflicts addressed by the African Great Lakes process. After the country gained independence from France in 1960 it has been ruled by a sequence of autocratic leaders that principally gained power through coups. Since the mid-1990s several waves of internal conflict took place in the Central African Republic, primarily along tribal, and later-on increasingly sectarian, lines. In 1996 and 1997, French troops and soldiers from neighbouring countries intervened to end a mutiny in the capital, Bangui, by factions of the army. The fighting was predominantly along tribal lines, with southern tribes in revolt against the ‘northern’ government. A UN mission was installed in 1998 to secure the truce.
After General Bozizé took control of the country after several coup attempts in 2003, a ‘bush war’ began led by armed opposition forces. From late 2006 onward, government troops with French military support severely weakened the rebels. Following this, a number of agreements were signed during 2007-2008, but not all factions have accepted them. In 2011, Bozizé was re-elected in supposedly fraudulent elections, which resulted in a new wave of uprisings. Séléka, an alliance of northern rebel groups, took over parts of the country and forced Bozizé to agree to a power-sharing deal. However, after this agreement broke down, Séléka took control of Bangui and Bozizé had to flee the country in 2013. Leader of Séléka, Michel Djotodia, took office and officially disbanded Séléka. However, continual violence between ex-Séléka groups and opposing militias, collectively known as ‘anti-balaka’, persisted and Djotodia was forced to resign less than a year later. Catherine Samba-Panza was installed as interim president until Faustin Archange Touadéra was elected in January 2016. In February 2019 an agreement was signed between the government and fourteen armed groups, including ex-Seleka groups, committed to disarmament. However, violence between ex-Seleka groups and anti-balaka continues.
Central African Republic Conflicts (1996 - ) )
Stage
Pre-negotiation/process (Principles)
Conflict nature
Inter-group
Peace process
154: CAR: African Initiative (and related) Process
A process supported by the AU as the African Initiative, but later supplemented by Sudan-Russia mediated agreements.
Parties
14 armed groups, signed in French language original pdf.
RPRC Rassemblement Patriotique pour le Renouveau de la Centrafrique
FDPC Front démocratique du peuple centrafricain
ATB / MOKOM Anti-Balaka, Mokom faction
3R Retour, réclamation et réhabilitation
UFR-R Union des forces républicaines (fraction)
MPC Mouvement Patriotic Centrafricain
UPC Unité pour la paix en Centrafrique
MLCJ Mouvement des libérateurs centrafricains pour la justice
FPRC Front Populaire pour la Renaissance de la Centrafrique
SELEKA - RENOVEE Séléka Rénovée
ATB / PEN Anti-Balaka, National coordination of the ex-anti-Balaka, Patrice-Edouard Ngaïssona
RJ / B Révolution and Justice (splintered, Belanga)
RJS Révolution and Justice (Sayo)
UFR Union des forces républicaines
Third parties
No third parties recorded as signing the agreement. However, secondary sources suggest that the agreement resulted from the Initiative for Peace and Reconciliation, which was adopted by the African Union on 17 July 2017.
Description
In this agreement, resulting from a listening 'exercise' and facilitation by the AU's Initiative for Peace and Reconciliation, the 14 armed groups address the government of CAR with a list of demands, spanning political reform, socio-economic reconstruction, matters of security, and issues related to peace, rights, and humanitarian concerns. The groups, which had fought amongst themselves, agree to common positions which were subsequently presented to the government.

Agreement document
CF_180830_Synthesis_of_the_Harmonised_Claims_of_the_Armed_Groups_of_the_CAR_Bouar_tr.pdf []

Agreement document (original language)
CF_30082018_Synthesis_of_the_Harmonised_Claims_of_the_Armed_Groups_of_the_RCO_Bouar.pdf (1).pdf []

Main category
Page 2, Column A. Political [demands]:
9. Promotion and respect for women's rights;

Page 1, Column B. Socio-economic [demands]:
4. Support for associations and NGOs, women, young people, etc.

Page 3, Column B. Socio-economic [demands]:
20. Set up of a microcredit fund intended to finance the initiatives of young people and women associated with armed groups;

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
Other
Page 3, Column B. Socio-economic [demands]:
20. Set up of a microcredit fund intended to finance the initiatives of young people and women associated with armed groups;
International law
No specific mention.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
No specific mention.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
No specific mention.
Development
General
Page 3, Column B. Socio-economic [demands]:
20. Set up of a microcredit fund intended to finance the initiatives of young people and women associated with armed groups;
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
Page 2, Column A. Political [demands]:
9. Promotion and respect for women's rights;

Page 1, Column B. Socio-economic [demands]:
4. Support for associations and NGOs, women, young people, etc.

The University of Edinburgh