Draft Treaty on the Delimitation of Subjects of Jurisdiction and Powers between the Russian Federation Organs of State Power and the Chechen Republic Organs of State Power

Country/entity
Russia
Chechnya
Region
Europe and Eurasia
Agreement name
Draft Treaty on the Delimitation of Subjects of Jurisdiction and Powers between the Russian Federation Organs of State Power and the Chechen Republic Organs of State Power
Date
31/05/1996
Agreement status
Status unclear
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Chechnya Conflicts (1991 - 2009)
The First Chechen War (1995 - 1997)
Following the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, relations between the Federal Russian government with the over 100 ethnic groups deteriorated as demands for autonomy became a major political issue. In March 1992, a federation treaty was drafted and by 1994 the treaty was signed between 87 of the 88 federal jurisdictions and central government, with Chechnya being the exception. The conflict erupted in 1991 following the death of the head of the Communist Party in Grozny when a faction of the USSR’s dissolved military stormed Party Headquarters. Russian forces failed to re-take Grozny and in 1993 the Chechen Republic of Ichkeria announced its independence. Violence and discrimination preceded economic stagnation as non-Chechnens fled the region, and eventually an undeclared civil war broke out as the Chechen opposition attempted a counter-coup against the Chechen ruler Dzhokhar Dudayev. Following the dissolution of the Chechen Parliament in June 1993, a state of emergency was declared, and in December that year an other coup was attempted by the opposition. Issues of sovereignty spurred an assault by Russian troops in December 1994, marking the start of the first Chechen War wherein Russian troops faced four years of insurgency until a ceasefire was unilaterally declared in 1996. A peace treaty was signed in 1997 and Russian forces withdrew.


The Second Chechen War (1999 - 2004)
The inter-war period was marked by economic desolation, corruption and crime. Political polarization was rife, and religious extremism flourished. In August 1999, the Islamic International Brigade led by Shamil Basayev invaded the Russian Republic of Dagestan seeking to found an Islamic State, thereby sparking the Second Chechen War. In response, the Russian Federation began a bombing campaign against the Chechen government and eventually re-took Grozny. An insurgency began following the fall of the Chechen government and separatist attacks spurred an increasingly harsh response from the Kremlin. By 2006, the main separatist leaders had been killed, and the republic has been run by the pro-Russian government led by Ramzan Kadyrov since 2007.
Chechnya Conflicts (1991 - 2009) )
Stage
Pre-negotiation/process (Principles)
Conflict nature
Government/territory
Peace process
100: Chechnya peace process
Parties
Russian Federation, Chechen Republic
Third parties
Description
Provides for ‘the special status within the Russian Federation of the Chechen Republic as a sovereign, democratic, rule-of-law, social state’. Provides for a delimitation of Russian and Chechen competencies.

Agreement document
RU_960531_Draft Treaty on the Delimitation of Subjects of Jurisdiction and Powers.pdf

Main category
Page 4, Article 6 , The following come under the joint jurisdiction of the Russian Federation and the Chechen Republic:
... 7. The coordination of health-care issues; the protection of the family, motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood; social protection, including social provision;

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
Pregnancy/maternity
Page 4, Article 6 , The following come under the joint jurisdiction of the Russian Federation and the Chechen Republic:
... 7. The coordination of health-care issues; the protection of the family, motherhood, fatherhood, and childhood; social protection, including social provision;
International law
No specific mention.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
No specific mention.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
No specific mention.
Development
No specific mention.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh