Renewed Commitment by the Afghan Government to the Afghan People and the International Community to Afghanistan (Kabul Conference Communique)

Country/entity
Afghanistan
Region
Europe and Eurasia
Agreement name
Renewed Commitment by the Afghan Government to the Afghan People and the International Community to Afghanistan (Kabul Conference Communique)
Date
22/07/2010
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Agreement/conflict level
Interstate/intrastate conflict(s) (Afghan Wars (1979 - )
The agreements are drawn from two distinct conflict periods. Post Soviet-intervention period. First, after an uprising against the communist government, the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in December 1979 and set up a puppet government. Fierce resistance came in on the form of domestic and foreign Mujahidin fighters who, by 1988, forced the Soviet Union to withdraw. The Communist government that remained was defeated in 1992 against a background of violence, which spiralled into a tumultuous multi-party civil war with a strong tribal basis. In 1993 a peace accord was signed, but by 1994 the conflict realigned itself as the Islamic-based Taliban emerged from the refugee camps, eventually occupying the capital city of Kabul in September 1996 spurring groups that had militantly opposed the communist government to unite in opposition to the Taliban.

Post US-intervention period. After the terror attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States invaded Afghanistan and removed the Taliban from power. In December 2001, the UNSC mandated the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) to assist Afghanistan’s interim authorities. In 2003 ISAF command was placed under NATO’s responsibility. Within three years, however, the Taliban managed to re-group and re-structure and launched intense resistance to the internationally-recognized Afghanistan government and NATO support troops. Despite this resurgence of the Taliban, NATO leaders lacked the necessary support for the mission abroad, and NATO troops were withdrawn by the end of 2014.
Afghan Wars (1979 - ) )
Stage
Implementation/renegotiation (Addresses new or outstanding issues)
Conflict nature
Government
Peace process
2: Afghanistan: 2000s Post-intervention process
Parties
Not signed, agreement mentions the following parties as having produced it: The Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the international community
Third parties
Description
This agreement outlines commitments by the government of Afghanistan and unspecified members of the international community, covering: international donations; governance, rule of law, and human rights; gender and children's rights; economic and social development; peace, reconciliation and reintegration; security; regional cooperation; and security.

Agreement document
AF_100722_Kabul Conference Communique.pdf

Main category
Page 2, Preamble, 5
The Kabul Process recognises that the Afghan Government can guarantee security only when its people are confident in its ability to deliver public services, good governance, human rights protection including gender equality, and economic opportunities. All parties recognise that the chance to deliver on these commitments has been earned through tragic losses, including civilian casualties, and the tremendous sacrifices of the Afghan and international armed forces currently engaged in the struggle for peace and stability in Afghanistan.

Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation. In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.

Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, 13
Participants welcomed the outcomes of the Consultative Peace Jirga, held from 2-4 June 2010. The Consultative Peace Jirga demonstrated the strong will within Afghan society to reconcile their differences politically in order to end the conflict. The Government of Afghanistan noted the demand of the Consultative Peace Jirga that all parties engaged in the conflict respect the need to bring lasting peace through mutual understanding and negotiations, in full respect of the values and rights, including those of Afghanistan’s women, enshrined in Afghanistan's Constitution, and through inclusive elections. Participants welcomed the establishment of an inclusive High Peace Council composed of women and men to set policy, strengthen political confidence and build consensus.

Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, 14
Accordingly, Participants welcomed and endorsed in principle the Afghan Government's Peace and Reintegration Programme, which is open to all Afghan members of the armed opposition and their communities who renounce violence, have no links to international terrorist organizations, respect the Constitution and are willing to join in building a peaceful Afghanistan. The international community reiterated its commitment to continue to support this endeavor through the Peace and Reintegration Trust Fund, and looks forward to local Peace Jirga meetings that include men and women at district and provincial levels to discuss elements of an enduring peace.

Page 9, Next Steps: Supporting Afghan Ownership and Leadership, Strengthening International Partnership, 31
The participants recognized the paramount importance of holding transparent, inclusive and credible elections in the fall, encouraging the full participation of female as well as male candidates and voters, and the Afghan Government in particular is fully committed to ensuring this objective and welcomes the international community’s support.

Women, girls and gender

Participation
Effective participation
Page 9, Next Steps: Supporting Afghan Ownership and Leadership, Strengthening International Partnership, Article 31
The participants recognized the paramount importance of holding transparent, inclusive and credible elections in the fall, encouraging the full participation of female as well as male candidates and voters, and the Afghan Government in particular is fully committed to ensuring this objective and welcomes the international community’s support.
Equality
Equality (general)
Page 2, Preamble, Article 5
The Kabul Process recognises that the Afghan Government can guarantee security only when its people are confident in its ability to deliver public services, good governance, human rights protection including gender equality, and economic opportunities. All parties recognise that the chance to deliver on these commitments has been earned through tragic losses, including civilian casualties, and the tremendous sacrifices of the Afghan and international armed forces currently engaged in the struggle for peace and stability in Afghanistan.
Social equality
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation. In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.
Particular groups of women
No specific mention.
International law
General IHRL, IHL and IL
Page 2, Preamble, Article 5
The Kabul Process recognises that the Afghan Government can guarantee security only when its people are confident in its ability to deliver public services, good governance, human rights protection including gender equality, and economic opportunities. All parties recognise that the chance to deliver on these commitments has been earned through tragic losses, including civilian casualties, and the tremendous sacrifices of the Afghan and international armed forces currently engaged in the struggle for peace and stability in Afghanistan.

Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.

Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, Article 13
Participants welcomed the outcomes of the Consultative Peace Jirga, held from 2-4 June 2010. The Consultative Peace Jirga demonstrated the strong will within Afghan society to reconcile their differences politically in order to end the conflict. The Government of Afghanistan noted the demand of the Consultative Peace Jirga that all parties engaged in the conflict respect the need to bring lasting peace through mutual understanding and negotiations, in full respect of the values and rights, including those of Afghanistan’s women, enshrined in Afghanistan's Constitution, and through inclusive elections. Participants welcomed the establishment of an inclusive High Peace Council composed of women and men to set policy, strengthen political confidence and build consensus.
International human rights standards
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
...
In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.

Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, Article 13
Participants welcomed the outcomes of the Consultative Peace Jirga, held from 2-4 June 2010. The Consultative Peace Jirga demonstrated the strong will within Afghan society to reconcile their differences politically in order to end the conflict. The Government of Afghanistan noted the demand of the Consultative Peace Jirga that all parties engaged in the conflict respect the need to bring lasting peace through mutual understanding and negotiations, in full respect of the values and rights, including those of Afghanistan’s women, enshrined in Afghanistan's Constitution, and through inclusive elections. Participants welcomed the establishment of an inclusive High Peace Council composed of women and men to set policy, strengthen political confidence and build consensus.
New institutions
Infrastructure (general)
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation. In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.
Reconciliation and peace
Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, Article 14
Accordingly, Participants welcomed and endorsed in principle the Afghan Government's Peace and Reintegration Programme, which is open to all Afghan members of the armed opposition and their communities who renounce violence, have no links to international terrorist organizations, respect the Constitution and are willing to join in building a peaceful Afghanistan. The international community reiterated its commitment to continue to support this endeavor through the Peace and Reintegration Trust Fund, and looks forward to local Peace Jirga meetings that include men and women at district and provincial levels to discuss elements of an enduring peace.
Violence against women
Gender-based violence/VAW (general)
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
...
In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
DDR, army, parastatal or rebel forces
Page 6, Peace, Reconciliation and Reintegration, Article 14
Accordingly, Participants welcomed and endorsed in principle the Afghan Government's Peace and Reintegration Programme, which is open to all Afghan members of the armed opposition and their communities who renounce violence, have no links to international terrorist organizations, respect the Constitution and are willing to join in building a peaceful Afghanistan. The international community reiterated its commitment to continue to support this endeavor through the Peace and Reintegration Trust Fund, and looks forward to local Peace Jirga meetings that include men and women at district and provincial levels to discuss elements of an enduring peace.
Public administration
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
...
Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation.
Development
Education
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation. In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.
Health (general)
Page 5, Gender and Children’s Rights, Article 10
Participants reiterated the centrality of women's rights, including political, economic and social equality, to the future of Afghanistan, as enshrined in the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. Participants commended the mainstreaming of gender into all priority programmes and reiterated their commitment to assist all national ministries and sub-national government bodies in implementing their respective responsibilities under the National Action Plan for the Women of Afghanistan (NAPWA), and to ensure that all training and civic education programmes contribute to concrete advancements in its implementation. In addition, the Government of Afghanistan, over the next six months, is to identify and prioritize NAPWA benchmarks for implementation within each cluster; and develop a strategy to implement the Elimination of Violence Against Women Law (EVAW), including services for victims. Participants committed to respect and prioritise the fulfilment of the rights of Afghan children, and to invest in girls’ and boys’ education, protection and healthcare.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh