Acuerdo Final entre el Gobierno Nacional y el Movimieto Armado Quintin Lame, Campamento de Pueblo Nuevo Caldono-Cauca

Country/entity
Colombia
Region
Americas
Agreement name
Acuerdo Final entre el Gobierno Nacional y el Movimieto Armado Quintin Lame, Campamento de Pueblo Nuevo Caldono-Cauca
Date
27/05/1991
Agreement status
Multiparty signed/agreed
Agreement/conflict level
Intrastate/intrastate conflict (Colombian Conflict (1964 - )
The Colombian conflict is really a set of conflicts and the peace agreements reflect both different processes relating to different conflict groups and dyads, and processes taking place at different times in a complex peace process history. The Colombian civil war has its roots in the late 1940s and the violent infighting between liberal and the conservative factions. Emerging from the liberal tradition with a thorough grounding in nationalist communist ideology, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia—People's Army (FARC) began its armed insurrection against the Colombian government in 1964. Other left-wing guerrillas emerged as well, most notably the socialist/populist M-19, which would later be integrated into the formal political system in the peace process of 1990s; the National Liberation Army (ELN), which has strong roots in liberation theology, and the Maoist Ejército Popular de Liberación (EPL) (also part of the 1990 process, less successfully). Several stages of peace processes were undertaken by the various sides, which were further complicated by the emergence of right-wing paramilitary ‘self-defence’ forces. The peace agreement between the Colombian government under President Uribe and the main alliance of the paramilitary groups, the United Self-Defence Forces of Colombia (AUC), concluded in 2005 and is still heavily disputed as several remnants are still active, but now subsumed under the heading ‘Bacrim’ (Bandas criminales). In addition, FARC and ELN maintain a military presence, but both demonstrate a strong interest in completing successful peace negotiations with the government, with the most recent agreements being between FARC and the Government.

Colombian Conflict (1964 - ) )
Stage
Framework/substantive - comprehensive (Agreement)
Conflict nature
Government
Peace process
106: Colombia I - Gaviria
Parties
For the national government:
JESUS ANTONIO BEJARANO, Peace Council
CARLOS EDUARDO JARAMILLO C., Council Adviser
ALVARO HERNANDEZ, Council Adviser
TOMAS CONCHA S., Council Adviser
HUMBERTO VERGARA P. Council Adviser
GONZALO DE FRANCISCO Z., Council Adviser
GABRIEL RESTREPO F., Council Adviser

For MAQL:
Chief of staff:

GILDARDO FERNANDEZ
CARLOS ANDRADE
RICARDO ROMERO
RUBEN DARIO MONROY
RICHARD SANCHEZ
FRANKY GUERRERO

Political leadership:
LEONARDO ULCUE
CIRO TIQUE
IVAN QUINTERO
FERNANDO MUÑOZ
GABRIEL MARTINEZ
Third parties
International monitors:
The World Council of Indigenous Peoples:
DONALD ROJAS, President
RODRIGO CONTRERAS

The Spanish Human Rights Association:
LUIS OTERO FERNANDEZ
Description
Building on the 1990 negotiations, provided for arrangements similar to above agreements (i.e. DDR of armed group and provision for transforming the group into a political party with representation at the National Constituent Assembly).


Agreement document
CO_910527_Acuerdo Final Entre El Gobierno Nacional Y El Movimiento Armado Quintin Lame - tr.pdf

Agreement document (original language)
CO_910527_Acuerdo Final Entre El Gobierno Nacional Y El Movimiento Armado Quintin Lame - SP.pdf

Main category
Page 5, III. Guarantees, Article h,
The government is obliged to provide members of the armed movement with two changes of clothes, comprising a pair of boots, a pair of trousers, a shirt, a pair of socks and male or female underwear, in line with the sizes specified by the organisation. The first change of clothes will be provided in the camp in April, in line with the previous commitment. The second will be provided before the surrender of arms, together with one case per person.

Women, girls and gender

Participation
No specific mention.
Equality
No specific mention.
Particular groups of women
No specific mention.
International law
No specific mention.
New institutions
No specific mention.
Violence against women
No specific mention.
Transitional justice
No specific mention.
Institutional reform
DDR, army, parastatal or rebel forces
Page 6, III. Guarantees:

h. The Government commits to provide the members of the armed movement with two sets of clothing, each consisting of a pair of boots, a pair of trousers, a shirt, a pair of socks and underwear both male and female, according to sizes provided by the organisation.
Development
No specific mention.
Implementation
No specific mention.
Other
No specific mention.

The University of Edinburgh